This is an article I liked and found valuable on Psychology Today. The link to the original article is here.

Over the last few weeks, we’ve looked at the four behaviors that differentiate a functional manager from a true leader.  As you know, I refer to these behaviors as the “Phenomenal Four,” which include:

  • Cultivating Reflective Silence
  • Capturing Meaningful Stories
  • Reinforcing What’s Important
  • Posing Curious Questions

If you haven’t had a chance to read the first two entries in this series, I recommendstarting here, then reading this.

Today, we are going to examine the third behavior: Reinforcing What’s Important.

In its most basic form, reinforcing what’s important is about ensuring you are working on the most important things each day. This behavior may seem ordinary, cliché in fact.  However, I would caution you not to dismiss it as just another tip for time management.

This third behavior, in all of its supposed simplicity, may be the most powerful out of the four in distinguishing a functional manager from a leader.

Let’s dive in.

The Truth About Time Management

In the last year, I (like many people) read Marie Kondo’s charming book The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up.  One thing that struck me was her conviction that before you can begin to organize your possessions you must first cull through them and purge what does not bring you joy.

Ms. Kondo notes that most people skip this purge and go straight to organizing, assuming that they are happy with everything they have.  However, over time organizing becomes harder and harder the more things you accumulate.

To me, this is exactly what is wrong with traditional approaches to time management.

Instead of starting the process from a place of deciding what is important, we assume the worthiness of all our existing commitments, responsibilities, and activities and focus exclusively on how to fit them all together into our waking hours.  Over time, this challenge becomes greater and greater, and pretty soon our efforts to “manage” time become akin to efforts to “manage” clutter: futile.

This is why I say leaders don’t manage time, they manage choices.  They constantly try to stay attune to what is important in their life (what brings them “joy,” as Ms. Kondo says) and make decisions on a daily, sometimes hourly basis based on it.

While managers struggle to fit everything into a day, a leader is willing to purge, delegate, or just say no to anything that isn’t truly important.

The ability to reinforce what is important, and exert energy in accordance with what is important, is what makes this third behavior so powerful.

The Third Behavior: Reinforcing What’s Important

The behavior of reinforcing what’s important is about giving yourself a moment each day to see both the big picture and the little pieces at the same time so you can act accordingly.

This means taking five minutes at the beginning or end of the day to review your list of big picture goals, and then reviewing your daily action plan to ensure you’re working on the most important things related to your larger goals.

I have found this to be an invaluable strategy for helping me to stay above the urgent-not-important things that bombard leaders every day.  It is also a great way to keep those seemingly productive time sucks (i.e. email, social media) in their proper place.

Personally, I review my lists at both the start and end of the work day. It’s always satisfying to strike through an action or two or three or more. Over time, I realized that when I took care of the important items, my work really progressed. I finished that webinar design. I published that blog. I got that meeting scheduled where a decision had to be made.

I also noticed that when I did the items that were the least pleasant, progress was faster. What was it about those items? They were the ones I was avoiding because they had implications, and as a result were important. Avoidance was coming out of my fear that they would not produce the right implications. What was I afraid of? Today, as I look at the list either in the morning when I am determining which are the most important or at the end of the day when I am considering the accomplishments of the day, I’m conscious of what avoidance means. It tells me exactly which are the most important.

This week, challenge yourself to reinforce what is important by keeping a list of long-term goals alongside your daily action list, and check it at least once a day. Tell me about how this behavior is working for you here or on Twitter: @madelynblair!

Next week, we will explore the final Phenomenal Four behavior: Posing Curious Questions!

Archu's Scribbles


It takes courage to say something to someone. Be it anything. From simplest things to difficult life changing decisions. People try to convey what they want to say. At times it maybe a success or a fail. Communication is the key. Above all that we need courage to communicate what we want to say all the way from the heart.

It also takes a person courage to listen. Listen to the other person what he wants to say from bottom of his/her heart. To listen and understand what the person is trying to communicating so courageously. It takes a heart to listen to a person and its a big deal. It wouldn’t be necessary for us to take action but just listening is so important and effective.

People today don’t have the time to listen. So many things come in between. Maybe lack of prioritizing. Maybe lack of interest. But…

View original post 52 more words

When you join a new job, you don’t know what you don’t know.

Success in a new job is not about doing what you know or waiting for you to be told what to do. It is mostly about getting to know what you need to know. This is mostly about working with people. And with people humor, sarcasm, etc. becomes important to build that human quotient.

Sell-in: how many units of a product is a manufacturer selling into the retailer

Sell-out: how many units of a product is selling out to the customer (from the retailer)

Sell-through is the same as sell out. They just invented it to confuse you.

It’s the opposite end of the spectrum from engagement. The engaged employee is energized, involved, and high-performing; the burned-out employee is exhausted, cynical, and overwhelmed.

Research shows that burnout has three dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. When you’re emotionally exhausted, you feel used up—not just emotionally, but often physically and cognitively as well. You can’t concentrate. You’re easily upset or angered, you get sick more often, and you have difficulty sleeping. Depersonalization shows up in feelings of alienation from and cynicism towards the people your job requires you to interact with. One of my coaching clients summed it up like this: “I feel like I’m watching myself in a play. I know my role, I can recite my lines, but I just don’t care.” What’s worse, although you can’t imagine going on like this much longer, you don’t see a feasible way out of your predicament.

It’s this third dimension of burnout — reduced personal accomplishment — that traps many employees in situations where they suffer. When you’re burned out, your capacity to perform is compromised, and so is your belief in yourself. In an insidious twist, employers may misinterpret an employee suffering from burnout as an uncooperative low performer rather than as a person in crisis. When that’s the case, you’re unlikely to get the support you desperately need.

Research shows that burnout occurs when the demands people face on the job outstrip the resources they have to meet them. Certain types of demands are much more likely to tax people to the point of burnout, especially a heavy workload, intense pressure, and unclear or conflicting expectations. A toxic interpersonal environment—whether it shows up as undermining, back-stabbing, incivility, or low trust—is a breeding ground for burnout because it requires so much emotional effort just to cope with the situation. Role conflict, which occurs when the expectations of one role that’s important to you conflict with those of another, also increases risk of burnout. This might happen, for example, when the demands of your job make it impossible to spend adequate time with your loved ones, or when the way you’re expected to act at work clashes with your sense of self.

If you think you might be experiencing burnout, don’t ignore it; it won’t go away by itself. The consequences of burnout for individuals are grave, including coronary disease, hypertension, gastrointestinal problems, depression, anxiety, increased alcohol and drug use, marital and family conflict, alienation, sense of futility, and diminished career prospects. The costs to employers include decreased performance, absenteeism, turnover, increased accident risk, lowered morale and commitment, cynicism, and reduced willingness to help others.

To get back to thriving, it’s essential to understand that burnout is fundamentally a state of resource depletion. In the same way that you can’t continue to drive a car that’s out of fuel just because you’d like to get home, you can’t overcome burnout simply by deciding to “pull yourself together.” Rebounding from burnout and preventing its recurrence requires three things: replenishing lost resources, avoiding further resource depletion, and finding or creating resource-rich conditions going forward. Many resources are vital for our performance and well-being, from personal qualities like skills, emotional stability, and good health, to supportive relationships with colleagues, autonomy and control at work, constructive feedback, having a say in matters that affect us, and feeling that our work makes a difference. Try these steps to combat burnout:

Prioritize taking care of yourself to replenish personal resources. Start by making an appointment with your doctor and getting an objective medical assessment. I encourage clients to take a lesson from the safety briefing provided at the beginning of every commercial flight, which instructs passengers to “secure your own oxygen mask before helping others.” In other words, if you want to be able to perform, you need to shore up your capacity to do so. Prioritize good sleep habits, nutrition, exercise, connection with people you enjoy, and practices that promote calmness and well-being, like meditation, journaling, talk therapy, or simply quiet time alone doing an activity you enjoy.

Analyze your current situation. Perhaps you already understand what’s burning you out. If not, try this: track how you spend your time for a week (you can either do this on paper, in a spreadsheet, or in one of the many apps now available for time tracking). For each block of time, record what you’re doing, whom you’re with, how you feel (e.g., on a scale of 1-10 where 0=angry or depressed and 10=joyful or energized), and how valuable the activity is. This gives you a basis for deciding where to make changes that will have the greatest impact. Imagine that you have a fuel gauge you can check to see what level your personal resources (physical, mental, and emotional) are at any moment. The basic principle is to limit your exposure to the tasks, people, and situations that drain you and increase your exposure to those that replenish you.

Reduce exposure to job stressors. Your condition may warrant a reduction in your workload or working hours, or taking some time away from work. Using your analysis of time spent and associated mood/energy level and value of activity as a guide, jettison low value/high frustration activities to the extent possible. If you find that there are certain relationships that are especially draining, limit your exposure to those people. Reflect on whether you have perfectionist tendencies; if so, consciously releasing them will lower your stress level. Delegate the things that aren’t necessary for you to do personally. Commit to disconnecting from work at night and on the weekends.

Increase job resources. Prioritize spending time on the activities that are highest in value and most energizing. Reach out to people you trust and enjoy at work. Look for ways to interact more with people you find stimulating. Talk to your boss about what resources you need to perform at your peak. For instance, if you lack certain skills, request training and support for increased performance, such as regular feedback and mentoring by someone who’s skilled. Brainstorm with colleagues about ways to modify work processes to make everyone more resourceful. For instance, you might institute an “early warning system” whereby people reach out for help as soon as they realize they’ll miss a deadline. You might also agree to regularly check in on where the team’s overall level of resources is and to take action to replenish it when it’s low.

Take the opportunity to reassess. Some things about your job are in your capacity to change; others are not. If, for example, the culture of your organization is characterized by pervasive incivility, it’s unlikely that you will ever thrive there. Or if the content of the work has no overlap with what you care about most, finding work that’s more meaningful may be an essential step to thriving. There is no job that’s worth your health, your sanity, or your soul. For many people, burnout is the lever that motivates them to pause, take stock, and create a career that’s more satisfying than what they’d previously imagined.

Unable to ship your products on time to your customers? Are your shipments returning to you after getting stuck atInter-State Checkpoints? Having difficulty in understanding the rules and finding the interstate shipping forms?

If these are the kind of questions that are troubling you with interstate shipping, then we have something incredibly awesome to share with you!

Logistics is crucial for any online store. Delivering your customers’ purchases on time reflects on your store’sefficiency and reliability. Delay in delivering the products is a risk you cannot afford as an online store entrepreneur.

But, living in a big country like India, rules change from State to State. Understanding these rules and finding the respective forms can be a very cumbersome task. That’s why, we bring you an exclusive table to help you sort out the necessary forms to be filled while scheduling a shipment.


   Interstate Shipping Forms and Requirements

Sr. No. List of destination State Business to Consumer (B2C) or Consumer to Consumer (C2C) Business to Business (B2B)
Type of statutory Levy Who is liable/ can pay statutory levy Road permit /paperwork requirement (INR) DOM paperwork exemption limit Status of statutory Levy Paperwork Requirement State VAT website
1 Andhra Pradesh Nil Shipper Invoice Nil
No Statutory levy is paid upfront
CI + VAT Form x/600
2 Andaman & Nicobar Nil Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
3 Arunachal Pradesh Entry Tax Consignee CI +DG -01 (TPT doc) <10,000 CI + DG 01
4 Assam Entry Tax Consignee CI+Form 62 <20,000 CI + VAT Form 61
5 Bihar VAT Consignee CI+ Form D IX – on line Nil CI + VAT Form D IX
6 Chandigarh Nil Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
7 Chattisgarh Nil Shipper Invoice Nil CI & Declaration from Cnee
8 Dadra & Nager Haveli Nil Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
9 Daman & Diu Nil Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
10 Delhi Nil Shipper Invoice Nil CI + T2
11 Goa Nil Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
12 Gujarat Nil CI + VAT Form 403 Nil CI + VAT Form 403
13 Haryana Nil Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
14 Himachal Pradesh Entry Tax Consignee / Carrier Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
15 Jammu & Kashmir Entry Tax Consignee / Carrier Shipper Invoice <5,000 CI + VAT From 65
16 Jharkhand Nil CI + VAT Form 502 Nil CI +VAT Form 504 G
17 Karnataka Nil Invoice & Declaration Nil CI + e-Sugam
18 Kerala Nil CI + Form 16 <5,000 Shipper Invoice
19 Lakshadweep Nil Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
20 Madhya Pradesh Nil CI+ VAT Form 50 online Nil CI + VAT Form 49 online
21 Maharashtra Octroi Carrier Shipper Invoice <150 Shipper Invoice + LBT/Octroi
22 Manipur Nil CI + VAT Form 37 Nil CI + VAT Form 27
22 Meghalaya Nil CI+ Special permit Nil CI + VAT Form 40
23 Mizoram Nil CI + VAT Form 34 Nil CI+VAT From 33
24 Nagaland Nil CI+ VAT Form 23 CI+ VAT Form 23 (online)
26 Orissa Entry Tax* Consignee Shipper Invoice Nil CI+ VAT Form 402 (online )
27 Pondicherry Nil Shipper Invoice NA Shipper Invoice
28 Punjab Entry Tax Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
29 Rajasthan Entry Tax Consignee CI + Declaration Nil CI + VAT Form 47/47A ( online )
30 Sikkim Nil CI + VAT Form 26 Nil CI+ VAT From 25
31 Tamil Nadu Nil Shipper Invoice Nil Shipper Invoice
32 Telangana Nil Shipper Invoice Nil CI + VAT Form x/600
323 Tripura Nil CI+ VAT Permit CI+ VAT FROM XXIV
34 Uttar Pradesh Nil CI + VAT Form 39 Nil CI +VATe-sancharan
35 Uttrakhand Nil CI + Vat Form 17 <5,000 CI + VAT Form 16
36 West Bengal Entry Tax* Carrier Shipper Invoice + VAT Form 50A Nil CI + VAT Form 50A

From this table, find the State to which you are shipping your products. Cross check the conditions to know what form is required. Get the forms from the links given in the table. The links to the state government have been provided in the table.

How and when do you use these forms?

You will need to provide the filled forms to the person arriving for the pick up. The logistic company will produce this form for you at the check points. Rest assured, as your products travel safe to reach your customers at far off places.

Thus, you can now send your products to your lovely customers with ease and make sure the shipments don’t return because of a lack of documents. Happy selling! 🙂

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